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View Full Version : Why is it so hard to become canadian !


megz
03-21-2007, 02:17 PM
why is it hard for an american to become canadian but i see other nationalities here and they have no problems , and all the sites on the internet just confuse me more:confused: is there any other way to become canadian with out marriage ?

user5624
03-21-2007, 02:20 PM
I'm curious about that as well. Doesn't seem easy for Americans to immigrate here. It's a shame.

megz
03-21-2007, 02:27 PM
Yeah i know !! And especially when they have a pregnant girlfriend in canada!

rubycshells
03-21-2007, 03:43 PM
Marrying someone does not guarantee that they will be allowed into Canada either. Check the immigration laws.

girdy
03-21-2007, 04:10 PM
This is the only site you should look at for definitive information : http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/index.html

I don't think it is any harder for Americans to become Canadian immigrants or citizens, it takes a long time for anyone. Even when you see immigrants here, it usually means that they spent years to try and get here in the first place, and it'll be 4-5 years before they can change from immigrant to citizen. Sometimes groups are fast-tracked to immigration status because they are refugees or in some sort of danger, but then they get into the same citizenship process as far as I know. And that requires 3 years in the country, then applying for citizenship, a test, then approval.

I think the only context where Americans go through a different process, is that refugee status wouldn't be likely to be accepted.

megz
03-21-2007, 04:22 PM
But... if they cant legally stay longer then 6 months how can they live here 3 years ? it doesnt make sense !!!! nothing does i have called so many people and i get no wheres !!

girdy
03-21-2007, 05:03 PM
Well, we're not quite in a Big Brother society where the government tracks the whereabouts of every person who comes across the border, and then works to toss them out when their visit was supposed to finish. In fact, you don't even register with the Canadian government when you're leaving Canada, so there is no real way of knowing if a visitor is still here or not. Especially if the visitor left Canada and went to the U.S. by land. If someone is here and living with friends, there would be no easy means of knowing the person is still in the country, and especially where they were.

There are approximately 35 million people who visit Canada each year, thats a lot of people to keep track of and make sure they all left on time...

I think the government really just targets troublemakers to get them out, and they need to come to the attention of authorities before that process gets initiated. And it seems to be a huge effort to get rid of even the scum drugdealers, let alone someones grandmother who stayed a bit longer to look after the grandkids.

megz
03-21-2007, 07:57 PM
yeah well what if they are driving around with licence plates and the cops notice it a lot or something and why doesnt marriage make them canadian after 3 years ? i think its stupid when you have to travel 18 hours to visit and you can only stay for 6 months and you have a child on the way i thought once you marry them they can stay and whatever i think canada is dumb then my sister married an american and has a green card and can live in the states why is it so difficult in canada ?

paak
03-21-2007, 11:30 PM
You may have to fill out paperwork and pay fees to get the process started, so don't be surprised if it takes more than a phone call.

Try reading up here:
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/index.html

(was posted earler in this thread as well.)


Oh, and I'm proud to be a "dumb" Canadian LOL :)

The_Dave
03-21-2007, 11:57 PM
girdy has all the answers. Your awesome

megz
03-22-2007, 07:31 AM
that site does nothing but confuses me

paak
03-22-2007, 07:41 AM
Step-by-step guide:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomer/guide/index.html

megz
03-22-2007, 07:56 AM
someone just pm'ed me and said that , if you get married they still have to go home every 6 months ...

girdy
03-22-2007, 08:18 AM
yeah well what if they are driving around with licence plates and the cops notice it a lot or something and why doesnt marriage make them canadian after 3 years ? i think its stupid when you have to travel 18 hours to visit and you can only stay for 6 months and you have a child on the way i thought once you marry them they can stay and whatever i think canada is dumb then my sister married an american and has a green card and can live in the states why is it so difficult in canada ?

Megz, you have to calm down, and run the process. It's exactly the same process in the U.S. as it is in Canada, except it takes longer to become a U.S. Citizen. In Canada, you have to file immigration papers to sponsor him as a family member, and prove that your relationship is what it is (form IMM5002). You, Megz, have to commit to financially supporting him for a period of up to 10 years (form IMM1334). If you get divorced, you are responsible for supporting him, he would be in-eligible for social assistance. After reviewing the paperwork, they will offer him permanent residency. After he is here 3 years, he can apply for citizenship.

This is exactly the same process for the U.S.. Your sisters husband filled in form I-130 - Petition for Alien Relative and form I-864 - Affidavit for support. After 5 years of residency in the US, your sister could apply for citizenship.

I know more than a little about this, my wife has her citizenship test on March 26.

There are other ways he could immigrate here - as a skilled worker if he has expertise which is in short supply, or if he is a business person and has money to invest in Canada. Each requires applications, and in the case of the business immigration, will take even longer than family member sponsorship.

It begs the question, since you think it is trivial for you to become a US citizen, and it is hard for him to become a Canadian citizen - why you aren't moving to be with him? You don't seem to have much respect for Canada.

megz
03-22-2007, 11:40 AM
Megz, you have to calm down, and run the process. It's exactly the same process in the U.S. as it is in Canada, except it takes longer to become a U.S. Citizen. In Canada, you have to file immigration papers to sponsor him as a family member, and prove that your relationship is what it is (form IMM5002). You, Megz, have to commit to financially supporting him for a period of up to 10 years (form IMM1334). If you get divorced, you are responsible for supporting him, he would be in-eligible for social assistance. After reviewing the paperwork, they will offer him permanent residency. After he is here 3 years, he can apply for citizenship.

This is exactly the same process for the U.S.. Your sisters husband filled in form I-130 - Petition for Alien Relative and form I-864 - Affidavit for support. After 5 years of residency in the US, your sister could apply for citizenship.

I know more than a little about this, my wife has her citizenship test on March 26.

There are other ways he could immigrate here - as a skilled worker if he has expertise which is in short supply, or if he is a business person and has money to invest in Canada. Each requires applications, and in the case of the business immigration, will take even longer than family member sponsorship.

It begs the question, since you think it is trivial for you to become a US citizen, and it is hard for him to become a Canadian citizen - why you aren't moving to be with him? You don't seem to have much respect for Canada.



yeah i know , i dont like this country my father doesnt live here nor do half my family.. if i could move there i would but i have children in school and i could never move away from my mom imigration told me that if i get a job we can marry and then 3-10 years he can work etc. the paper work runs from 2000 to 2500 ?

girdy
03-22-2007, 04:43 PM
yeah i know , i dont like this country my father doesnt live here nor do half my family.. if i could move there i would but i have children in school and i could never move away from my mom imigration told me that if i get a job we can marry and then 3-10 years he can work etc. the paper work runs from 2000 to 2500 ?

The fees are less than that, maybe $1,000 approximately, but that's a trivial amount compared to your exposure. You would be sponsoring the father. He could show up, separate from you the next day, and you would be responsible for supporting him - paying his rent, his food, and keeping him above poverty level, whether he worked or not. He would not be able to get social assistance, if you had the financial ability to support him. The duration of that would be 3 years. If he has kids and you were also sponsoring them, you would be financially responsible for them until they've been in Canada for 10 years, or turn 25 years of age. He would not be financially responsible for them.

The reason it's not easy for someone to do this, is CIC needs to protect the rest of us, from you taking $5,000 under the table from this guy, have him come to Canada and immediately separate from you, and have the taxpayer support him. If you sponsor him, the taxpayer won't be supporting him if he leaves you - you will.

If you're not in a position to support more dependants yourself, then you should be very worried about attempting to sponsor someone.

I would suggest, that the father initiate his own immigration process as a skilled worker. Speaking bluntly, if he doesn't have the brains, work skills, and motivation to do that, he's not going to be much of a partner to you or father to your kids. You're not going to be able to start trying to sponsor him as a family member if you don't have the financial means to support him, so at the very least the process would get started while you work out that part of your life.

I appreciate this may sound like a scary note, and that was my intent. This is a potentially life ruining project you're doing, be darn sure you're going into this knowing all the facts, and being sure about the guy you'd be sponsoring.

megz
03-23-2007, 10:55 AM
Someone told me even if an american married a canadian the american would have to go back to states every 6 months but the 1-800 number told me that the only way they could live in canada is marriage or through school etc. and they never said anything about having to return every 6 months..

girdy
03-23-2007, 01:15 PM
Someone told me even if an american married a canadian the american would have to go back to states every 6 months but the 1-800 number told me that the only way they could live in canada is marriage or through school etc. and they never said anything about having to return every 6 months..

I believe that the maximum visit to Canada is 6 months. If you marry someone but they are not a permanent resident, then they are a visitor, and need to leave after 6 months.

You go through a change in status in immigrating:

When you have applied to immigrate, but they have not accepted your application yet, you can only visit for 6 months. That may take 2 years for processing.

When they have accepted your immigration application and you have come to Canada, you are called a Permanent Resident. You can stay full-time in Canada from that point forward without needing to visit the U.S.. You can remain a permanent resident forever, if you don't want to change citizenship.

After being in Canada for 3 years, you can apply for Canadian Citizenship. That process takes at least a year, you're still called a Permanent Resident through that time, and don't need to leave the country.

Then finally, you become a Canadian citizen.

t-bone
03-23-2007, 01:49 PM
the reason it is so hard is because it is such a great country!
it should be hard!

kara_sweetheart
03-23-2007, 02:30 PM
yeah thats what im trying to tell her on PM but my words are not as good.

I have been here off and on for over a year trying to get my permanent resident, we just sent off my paper work on tuesday!! Whooo Hooo!!! i cant wait to work!!!! 6 or 7 months!!! But the thing im not doing is getting my Citizenship because i will lose my American Citizenship. But any ways, I agree it should be hard in some ways they are just trying to protect the country. :biggrin: There are something on the immergration stuff thats pretty crazy they ask for.But i understand why.


I believe that the maximum visit to Canada is 6 months. If you marry someone but they are not a permanent resident, then they are a visitor, and need to leave after 6 months.

You go through a change in status in immigrating:

When you have applied to immigrate, but they have not accepted your application yet, you can only visit for 6 months. That may take 2 years for processing.

When they have accepted your immigration application and you have come to Canada, you are called a Permanent Resident. You can stay full-time in Canada from that point forward without needing to visit the U.S.. You can remain a permanent resident forever, if you don't want to change citizenship.

After being in Canada for 3 years, you can apply for Canadian Citizenship. That process takes at least a year, you're still called a Permanent Resident through that time, and don't need to leave the country.

Then finally, you become a Canadian citizen.

kara_sweetheart
03-23-2007, 02:35 PM
we spent more then 1000 the paper work alone is a 1040, the medical 940, sending the stuff off cost. And it depends on how you are doing the paper work also, if you are doing it as him being here the process take longer, and cost more, if you are doing it has him being out side of canada it only take 6 to 7 months and its cheaper.



The fees are less than that, maybe $1,000 approximately, but that's a trivial amount compared to your exposure. You would be sponsoring the father. He could show up, separate from you the next day, and you would be responsible for supporting him - paying his rent, his food, and keeping him above poverty level, whether he worked or not. He would not be able to get social assistance, if you had the financial ability to support him. The duration of that would be 3 years. If he has kids and you were also sponsoring them, you would be financially responsible for them until they've been in Canada for 10 years, or turn 25 years of age. He would not be financially responsible for them.

The reason it's not easy for someone to do this, is CIC needs to protect the rest of us, from you taking $5,000 under the table from this guy, have him come to Canada and immediately separate from you, and have the taxpayer support him. If you sponsor him, the taxpayer won't be supporting him if he leaves you - you will.

If you're not in a position to support more dependants yourself, then you should be very worried about attempting to sponsor someone.

I would suggest, that the father initiate his own immigration process as a skilled worker. Speaking bluntly, if he doesn't have the brains, work skills, and motivation to do that, he's not going to be much of a partner to you or father to your kids. You're not going to be able to start trying to sponsor him as a family member if you don't have the financial means to support him, so at the very least the process would get started while you work out that part of your life.

I appreciate this may sound like a scary note, and that was my intent. This is a potentially life ruining project you're doing, be darn sure you're going into this knowing all the facts, and being sure about the guy you'd be sponsoring.

megz
03-23-2007, 03:16 PM
i just dont understand why the 1-800 number told me something completely different

megz
03-23-2007, 04:15 PM
i just called again , they are sending me papers and she said if he does not wish to return to the states after the 6 months they give him a new visitor thingy for another 6 months

Kenya
03-26-2007, 02:05 PM
Megz,

My husband entered Canada in June 2003, We were married in July 03, and started the paper work in August 2003. Feb 1 2007 he finally became a Perm. Resident of Canada. He received his work visa in June 2006, before that he was given visitor visa's one year at a time that had to be renewed. He was not allowed to work and not allowed to go to school during that time. Now we have to wait two years, or log a certain amount of hours in Canada as a perm. resident before he can apply for citizenship. He has to live 3 out of 5 years in Canada or he can lose his PR status, that, and the fact that he can't vote and can't join the army are the only differences in full blown canadian citizenship. {We also had a lawyer and it still took forever, and my husband was from Maine, Five hours away}

Feel free to email me if you need help with your sponsership application, thats proably the easiest route for you from what I've read.

Kenya

kara_sweetheart
03-27-2007, 01:42 PM
http://www.diycanadaimmigration.com/faq/index.aspx

http://www.canadavisa.com/canadian-immigration-faq.html

here are some FAQ sites

:biggrin:

megz
03-27-2007, 03:59 PM
The sites just confuse me more , i called and got all the info i needed ..

megz
03-27-2007, 03:59 PM
thanks

artemisrane
04-01-2007, 04:32 PM
yeah i know , i dont like this country my father doesnt live here nor do half my family.. if i could move there i would but i have children in school and i could never move away from my mom imigration told me that if i get a job we can marry and then 3-10 years he can work etc. the paper work runs from 2000 to 2500 ?
How can you not like this country? It takes far better care of it's citizens then the US. You realize that in the US you would need to pay for your own healthcare and deal with all of the hassles that comes along with that. You said you have children so I am sure it would be a lot more expensive to raise a child down there just due to medical bills by itself. I also think we, as Canadians, get a lot more financial benefits for simply being parents!

This is the best place to live besides a few countries in Europe I wouldn't mind checking out. But I am sure there are cons to living there as well!

Also I am involved in an inter-racial relationship and that is something that is still socially unaccepted in many parts of the US. I find racial problems are worse there as well.

I just do not know how you can dislike a country with such diversity and acceptance. You are free to be who you are.

One day I was on the bus and I was pleasantly amazed at how many different cultures I surrounded with. There were Asian, French, and Muslim individuals and most were speaking in another language (than English). It was just so cool to see it all right there in one place. It really made me feel humble.